October 12-17, 2018

October 12-17, 2018

Charleston, SC

Charleston, SC

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Saturday Courses

October 13, 2018

05 – Advance BSL-3 Facility Operations

8:00 am  -  5:00 pm
2018-10-13 07:58:00 2018-10-13 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 05 – Advance BSL-3 Facility Operations This course is a follow up to the BSL-3 Facility Operations and Management course. This advanced course will focus on detailed aspects of biocontainment operations of BSL-3, ABSL-3 and enhanced BSL-3 laboratories. It will cover developing risk assessments for biocontainment facilities; facility operations and maintenance SOPs; maintenance personnel training requirements; solid and liquid waste decontamination equipment, procedures, validations and cycle developments; area decontamination methodologies, procedures and validations; filtration systems and their validation and testing process; ventilation control methodologies and ventilation equipment configuration; facility testing during normal and failure conditions of the ventilation system; test documentation and record keeping. Objectives: Explain the facility verification process in detail, including recommended test methodologies Identify methodologies for decontamination of areas, equipment, filters, and waste Restate the training requirements for facility personnel accessing the biocontainment areas and elements of biocontainment facility risk assessments Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Biosafety Level 3-Design and Operations, Principles & Practices of Biosafety Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Experienced Biosafety Professionals   Albuquerque Convention Center, Albuquerque, NM ABSA International [email protected]

This course is a follow up to the BSL-3 Facility Operations and Management course. This advanced course will focus on detailed aspects of biocontainment operations of BSL-3, ABSL-3 and enhanced BSL-3 laboratories. It will cover developing risk assessments for biocontainment facilities; facility operations and maintenance SOPs; maintenance personnel training requirements; solid and liquid waste decontamination equipment, procedures, validations and cycle developments; area decontamination methodologies, procedures and validations; filtration systems and their validation and testing process; ventilation control methodologies and ventilation equipment configuration; facility testing during normal and failure conditions of the ventilation system; test documentation and record keeping.

Objectives:

  • Explain the facility verification process in detail, including recommended test methodologies
  • Identify methodologies for decontamination of areas, equipment, filters, and waste
  • Restate the training requirements for facility personnel accessing the biocontainment areas and elements of biocontainment facility risk assessments

Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Biosafety Level 3-Design and Operations, Principles & Practices of Biosafety

Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Experienced Biosafety Professionals

 

06 – Emerging Technologies in Agricultural and Plant Sector: Biosafety and Biosecurity Challenges and Risk Management

8:00 am  -  5:00 pm
2018-10-13 07:59:00 2018-10-13 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 06 – Emerging Technologies in Agricultural and Plant Sector: Biosafety and Biosecurity Challenges and Risk Management Global food security and enhancement of food quality has been a pressing issue worldwide. Recent advent of powerful technologies in the bio-world (such as gene editing tool CRISPR) have the potential of bringing unprecedented global impact in different industries starting from novel bioenergy production and new therapeutic intervention in medical world to biodiversity conservation. In the agricultural sector, these technologies have contributed significantly towards food security, reduction in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions. Although extremely beneficial, these technologies are certainly not risk-free. They could be used for nefarious acts, such as bioweapon development or for creating new pathogenic organisms to render vaccines ineffective. These technologies may also have off-target effects, such as tumor suppressor gene silencing or potential of changing biodiversity and invasion and disruption of local agricultural system by exotic or transgenic species. Since, outbreak of diseases, bioweapons, and emerging technology transfer of knowledge knows no borders, the beneficial use of the technology can become challenging in terms of biosafety and biosecurity, if the risks are not understood and addressed appropriately. The goal of this course is to establish and integrate the basic concepts of biosafety/biosecurity applicable to agriculture and plant science including the new emerging technologies. In addition, this will present an integrative approach for multidisciplinary professionals from different countries to attain the optimal biosafety/biosecurity measures, when handling these tools-technologies. Objectives: Identify the different aspects and regulations about agricultural and plant biosafety/biosecurity Evaluate and conduct a risk assessment of the potential impact of using emerging technologies and gene editing in agriculture and plant projects Recall importance and impact of biosecurity-biosecurity programs in the development of new emerging technologies and impact in society and the environment Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment, Micro/Molecular Biology 101 Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Experienced Biosafety Professionals, Laboratory Workers Albuquerque Convention Center, Albuquerque, NM ABSA International [email protected]

Global food security and enhancement of food quality has been a pressing issue worldwide. Recent advent of powerful technologies in the bio-world (such as gene editing tool CRISPR) have the potential of bringing unprecedented global impact in different industries starting from novel bioenergy production and new therapeutic intervention in medical world to biodiversity conservation. In the agricultural sector, these technologies have contributed significantly towards food security, reduction in pesticide use and greenhouse gas emissions. Although extremely beneficial, these technologies are certainly not risk-free. They could be used for nefarious acts, such as bioweapon development or for creating new pathogenic organisms to render vaccines ineffective. These technologies may also have off-target effects, such as tumor suppressor gene silencing or potential of changing biodiversity and invasion and disruption of local agricultural system by exotic or transgenic species. Since, outbreak of diseases, bioweapons, and emerging technology transfer of knowledge knows no borders, the beneficial use of the technology can become challenging in terms of biosafety and biosecurity, if the risks are not understood and addressed appropriately. The goal of this course is to establish and integrate the basic concepts of biosafety/biosecurity applicable to agriculture and plant science including the new emerging technologies. In addition, this will present an integrative approach for multidisciplinary professionals from different countries to attain the optimal biosafety/biosecurity measures, when handling these tools-technologies.

Objectives:

  • Identify the different aspects and regulations about agricultural and plant biosafety/biosecurity
  • Evaluate and conduct a risk assessment of the potential impact of using emerging technologies and gene editing in agriculture and plant projects
  • Recall importance and impact of biosecurity-biosecurity programs in the development of new emerging technologies and impact in society and the environment

Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment, Micro/Molecular Biology 101

Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Experienced Biosafety Professionals, Laboratory Workers

07 – Keeping it Going: Maintaining and Improving a Select Agent Program Over the Long-Term

8:00 am  -  5:00 pm
2018-10-13 08:00:00 2018-10-13 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 07 – Keeping it Going: Maintaining and Improving a Select Agent Program Over the Long-Term Keeping a Select Agent program going can be difficult, especially in the face of ever-changing regulatory requirements (e.g., inactivation) and limited resources. Long-established procedures may suddenly become unacceptable, interrupting ongoing research, and frustrating laboratorians. Being prepared to deal with such changes is critical to maintaining a robust program. Anticipating future changes can prove even more advantageous, elevating a good program to a great program. A proactive approach can minimize the impact of new requirements and reduce duration and frequency of “crises” sparked by sudden, unexpected requirements. This course will explore strategies for maintaining and improving an existing Select Agent program, including strategies for anticipating and responding to new regulatory requirements. Strategies will be based upon the instructors’ experience with their institution’s Select Agent BSL-3 program, which has received 5 or fewer minor observations in individual inspections over the last 6 years, including zero observations in their most recent inspection in January 2018. Topics will include effective oversight practices, meeting ongoing documentation requirements, strategies for smoothly implementing changes into an existing program, inspection preparation and response, and a detailed discussion of new inactivation requirements and implementation strategies. The course will consist of topical presentations followed by group discussions and activities aimed at facilitating application of presented strategies to participants’ individual programs and providing a platform to capitalize on participants’ collective Select Agent program experience. Objectives: Identify strategies for efficiently maintaining a Select Agent program in good standing with ongoing requirements Identify strategies for preparing for and responding to regulatory inspections Describe the new inactivation requirements and identify successful strategies for compliance Suggested Background: Building a Select Agent Program: Safety, Compliance, and Efficiency Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Select Agent Program Safety Professionals Albuquerque Convention Center, Albuquerque, NM ABSA International [email protected]

Keeping a Select Agent program going can be difficult, especially in the face of ever-changing regulatory requirements (e.g., inactivation) and limited resources. Long-established procedures may suddenly become unacceptable, interrupting ongoing research, and frustrating laboratorians. Being prepared to deal with such changes is critical to maintaining a robust program. Anticipating future changes can prove even more advantageous, elevating a good program to a great program. A proactive approach can minimize the impact of new requirements and reduce duration and frequency of “crises” sparked by sudden, unexpected requirements. This course will explore strategies for maintaining and improving an existing Select Agent program, including strategies for anticipating and responding to new regulatory requirements. Strategies will be based upon the instructors’ experience with their institution’s Select Agent BSL-3 program, which has received 5 or fewer minor observations in individual inspections over the last 6 years, including zero observations in their most recent inspection in January 2018. Topics will include effective oversight practices, meeting ongoing documentation requirements, strategies for smoothly implementing changes into an existing program, inspection preparation and response, and a detailed discussion of new inactivation requirements and implementation strategies. The course will consist of topical presentations followed by group discussions and activities aimed at facilitating application of presented strategies to participants’ individual programs and providing a platform to capitalize on participants’ collective Select Agent program experience.

Objectives:

  • Identify strategies for efficiently maintaining a Select Agent program in good standing with ongoing requirements
  • Identify strategies for preparing for and responding to regulatory inspections
  • Describe the new inactivation requirements and identify successful strategies for compliance

Suggested Background: Building a Select Agent Program: Safety, Compliance, and Efficiency

Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Select Agent Program Safety Professionals

08 – Laboratory Facility Programming and Design Best Practices

8:00 am  -  5:00 pm
2018-10-13 08:01:00 2018-10-13 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 08 – Laboratory Facility Programming and Design Best Practices This course will offer an understanding of key principles underlying the programming and design of research and diagnostics laboratories. It is intended for architects, designers, and biosafety professionals desiring an increased awareness of the complexity and challenges associated with designing a laboratory. Participants will be introduced to the laboratory design process as it relates to programming and pre-design, building zoning, operational efficiency, biosafety and biosecurity considerations, and flexible/expandable strategies. Participants will participate in guided discussions, develop diagrams to illustrate best practice concepts and analyze existing plans with respect to the design principles under discussion. Objectives: Summarize the critical information that must be gathered prior to the development of a laboratory facility design Describe how to assemble and synthesize pre-design information appropriate to the development of a laboratory facility Paraphrase the principles of good laboratory design, and methods for developing, analyzing, and improving them Suggested Background: None Target Audience: All Biosafety Professionals, Architects & Engineers less familiar with lab design Albuquerque Convention Center, Albuquerque, NM ABSA International [email protected]

This course will offer an understanding of key principles underlying the programming and design of research and diagnostics laboratories. It is intended for architects, designers, and biosafety professionals desiring an increased awareness of the complexity and challenges associated with designing a laboratory. Participants will be introduced to the laboratory design process as it relates to programming and pre-design, building zoning, operational efficiency, biosafety and biosecurity considerations, and flexible/expandable strategies. Participants will participate in guided discussions, develop diagrams to illustrate best practice concepts and analyze existing plans with respect to the design principles under discussion.

Objectives:

  • Summarize the critical information that must be gathered prior to the development of a laboratory facility design
  • Describe how to assemble and synthesize pre-design information appropriate to the development of a laboratory facility
  • Paraphrase the principles of good laboratory design, and methods for developing, analyzing, and improving them

Suggested Background: None

Target Audience: All Biosafety Professionals, Architects & Engineers less familiar with lab design

09 – Gene Editing and Risk Assessment: Application to IBC Protocol Review

8:00 am  -  5:00 pm
2018-10-13 08:02:00 2018-10-13 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 09 – Gene Editing and Risk Assessment: Application to IBC Protocol Review Gene editing technologies have been used for decades by scientists in the field of molecular genetics and recombinant DNA technology. Recently, with the discovery of CRISPR-Cas 9 gene editing, this field has expanded and the ease to manipulate genes has changed significantly. There are multiple methods for editing genes and many times they are used together. Biosafety officers, although experts in safety and bio-risk assessment, may need additional information in regards to the scientific and technical side of this new technology in order to understand the risks of a protocol more completely in order to provide adequate risk management recommendations. This course is designed to provide a brief, but detailed, overview of basic gene editing technologies such as plasmid based systems, RNA interference, viral vectors, CRISPR Cas9 technology, and gene drives. After brief discussion of these technologies, participants will review a proposed project as it may be presented to the IBC. They will be expected to review, discuss risks and benefits, and be able to propose alternative ways for the research to be conducted in a safer manner. The goal of this course is to provide participants with comprehensive background knowledge of various gene editing and recombinant DNA technologies commonly used so they will be able to ask pertinent questions during protocol review. Additional details about off-targeting issues and streamlined protocol exercises will be offered. The course has been modified to incorporate comments from the first offering last year. Objectives: Describe the different types of gene editing technologies including viral vectors, RNAi and CRISPR/Cas9 Explain why and how these technologies are used together in a research project Restate the topics and questions needed to assess the risks of gene editing research proposals Suggested Background: Micro/Molecular Biology 101, Viral Vector Target Audience: Experienced Biosafety Professionals Albuquerque Convention Center, Albuquerque, NM ABSA International [email protected]

Gene editing technologies have been used for decades by scientists in the field of molecular genetics and recombinant DNA technology. Recently, with the discovery of CRISPR-Cas 9 gene editing, this field has expanded and the ease to manipulate genes has changed significantly. There are multiple methods for editing genes and many times they are used together. Biosafety officers, although experts in safety and bio-risk assessment, may need additional information in regards to the scientific and technical side of this new technology in order to understand the risks of a protocol more completely in order to provide adequate risk management recommendations. This course is designed to provide a brief, but detailed, overview of basic gene editing technologies such as plasmid based systems, RNA interference, viral vectors, CRISPR Cas9 technology, and gene drives. After brief discussion of these technologies, participants will review a proposed project as it may be presented to the IBC. They will be expected to review, discuss risks and benefits, and be able to propose alternative ways for the research to be conducted in a safer manner. The goal of this course is to provide participants with comprehensive background knowledge of various gene editing and recombinant DNA technologies commonly used so they will be able to ask pertinent questions during protocol review. Additional details about off-targeting issues and streamlined protocol exercises will be offered. The course has been modified to incorporate comments from the first offering last year.

Objectives:

  • Describe the different types of gene editing technologies including viral vectors, RNAi and CRISPR/Cas9
  • Explain why and how these technologies are used together in a research project
  • Restate the topics and questions needed to assess the risks of gene editing research proposals

Suggested Background: Micro/Molecular Biology 101, Viral Vector

Target Audience: Experienced Biosafety Professionals

10 – Introduction to Biosafety in the Clinical Setting

8:00 am  -  12:00 pm
2018-10-13 08:03:00 2018-10-13 12:00:00 America/Phoenix 10 – Introduction to Biosafety in the Clinical Setting The clinical setting poses a different environment and culture than research laboratories. This course provides foundations for applying biosafety concepts in the clinical setting. Topics will include common issues and lessons learned pertaining to: clinical facilities including pharmacies, laboratories, clinics, infusion areas, ORs and waste disposal facilities; PPE, disinfection, risk assessments and safety practices in the clinical setting; speaking biosafety to doctors, nursing staff, pharmacy staff, infection prevention and control, diagnostic microbiology lab personnel and hospital EHS staff; applying NIH Guidelines and the BMBL to the clinical setting; gaps in oversight of research safety for clinical trials. The course will close with a focus on clinical trials including: the role of an IRB and how it can overlap with an IBC; the process for investigational products to obtain FDA approval to be deemed as safe and effective therapeutics; and the evolving regulatory environment in the U.S. for biologics such as vaccines, regenerative medicines and gene therapy. The course is designed to be highly interactive with discussions, surveys, and team exercises. Objectives: Apply biosafety principles in the clinical setting Perform risk assessments and identify gaps in occupational safety in the clinical setting Discuss the regulatory oversight for clinical trials and the developmental process for investigational products Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Laboratory Workers, Research Administrators and Clinical Professionals Albuquerque Convention Center, Albuquerque, NM ABSA International [email protected]

The clinical setting poses a different environment and culture than research laboratories. This course provides foundations for applying biosafety concepts in the clinical setting. Topics will include common issues and lessons learned pertaining to: clinical facilities including pharmacies, laboratories, clinics, infusion areas, ORs and waste disposal facilities; PPE, disinfection, risk assessments and safety practices in the clinical setting; speaking biosafety to doctors, nursing staff, pharmacy staff, infection prevention and control, diagnostic microbiology lab personnel and hospital EHS staff; applying NIH Guidelines and the BMBL to the clinical setting; gaps in oversight of research safety for clinical trials. The course will close with a focus on clinical trials including: the role of an IRB and how it can overlap with an IBC; the process for investigational products to obtain FDA approval to be deemed as safe and effective therapeutics; and the evolving regulatory environment in the U.S. for biologics such as vaccines, regenerative medicines and gene therapy. The course is designed to be highly interactive with discussions, surveys, and team exercises.

Objectives:

  • Apply biosafety principles in the clinical setting
  • Perform risk assessments and identify gaps in occupational safety in the clinical setting
  • Discuss the regulatory oversight for clinical trials and the developmental process for investigational products

Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety

Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Laboratory Workers, Research Administrators and Clinical Professionals

11 – How to Respond to Emergency Scenarios in Biocontainment Laboratories

8:00 am  -  12:00 pm
2018-10-13 08:04:00 2018-10-13 12:00:00 America/Phoenix 11 – How to Respond to Emergency Scenarios in Biocontainment Laboratories It is important for biosafety professionals to understand how to respond to emergency response situations that could affect operations in containment laboratories. Emergency situations can affect a wide range of facility operations (electrical failures, plumbing, heating/ventilation/air conditioning [HVAC], etc.) and often occur with little or no warning to the biosafety professionals, scientific staff, or support staff. Biosafety professionals need to be able to thoroughly understand how their facility and personnel function during normal operations in order to aid in preparation for significant events. In addition to understanding their facility and personnel, it is also vital for biosafety professionals to know who the key decision makers are in their facility for situations that could potentially result in short- or long-term disruptions to operations. By understanding the critical information that is needed for the key decision makers during emergency scenarios, biosafety professionals can help ensure that they are prepared when situations arise in the future. This course is intended to cover basic information of emergency response situations along with the key features of a containment laboratory that may be affected during an emergency situation. This course will go over the key aspects of an HVAC, building electrical design, and plumbing systems. This is not an engineering course—it is intended to be a brief overview so biosafety professionals understand the right questions to ask during emergency situations. The course will be separated into 5 sections covering critical information that needs to be understood: basics of emergency response; HVAC; plumbing; electrical failures; and potential occupational exposures. A series of case studies based on real-world emergency response situations and potential occupational exposures in biocontainment laboratories will be conducted. Objectives: Describe the basics of emergency response and its relation to the decision making process during an emergency response situation affecting biocontainment laboratory operations Restate who are the key decision makers in your facility and who can authorize decisions that will make an impact Identify lessons learned after action reviews from case studies and potential occupational exposures and apply them to an incident response plan, if applicable Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, All Biosafety Professionals Albuquerque Convention Center, Albuquerque, NM ABSA International [email protected]

It is important for biosafety professionals to understand how to respond to emergency response situations that could affect operations in containment laboratories. Emergency situations can affect a wide range of facility operations (electrical failures, plumbing, heating/ventilation/air conditioning [HVAC], etc.) and often occur with little or no warning to the biosafety professionals, scientific staff, or support staff. Biosafety professionals need to be able to thoroughly understand how their facility and personnel function during normal operations in order to aid in preparation for significant events. In addition to understanding their facility and personnel, it is also vital for biosafety professionals to know who the key decision makers are in their facility for situations that could potentially result in short- or long-term disruptions to operations. By understanding the critical information that is needed for the key decision makers during emergency scenarios, biosafety professionals can help ensure that they are prepared when situations arise in the future. This course is intended to cover basic information of emergency response situations along with the key features of a containment laboratory that may be affected during an emergency situation. This course will go over the key aspects of an HVAC, building electrical design, and plumbing systems. This is not an engineering course—it is intended to be a brief overview so biosafety professionals understand the right questions to ask during emergency situations. The course will be separated into 5 sections covering critical information that needs to be understood: basics of emergency response; HVAC; plumbing; electrical failures; and potential occupational exposures. A series of case studies based on real-world emergency response situations and potential occupational exposures in biocontainment laboratories will be conducted.

Objectives:

  • Describe the basics of emergency response and its relation to the decision making process during an emergency response situation affecting biocontainment laboratory operations
  • Restate who are the key decision makers in your facility and who can authorize decisions that will make an impact
  • Identify lessons learned after action reviews from case studies and potential occupational exposures and apply them to an incident response plan, if applicable

Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment

Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, All Biosafety Professionals

12 – An Evolving Culture: Biorisk Management in Clinical Laboratories

1:00 pm  -  5:00 pm
2018-10-13 13:00:00 2018-10-13 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 12 – An Evolving Culture: Biorisk Management in Clinical Laboratories Clinical laboratories are unique environments. Their operations differ from those of academic (teaching) and research laboratories since the hazards associated with diagnostic specimens are almost always initially unknown. Serving as the frontline of defense for healthcare and public health systems, these labs regularly encounter both routine and emerging/resurging infectious agents. Additionally, they often conduct high-volume, high-throughput diagnostic testing, and rely on the use of highly automated instruments and technologies. The traditional guidance for biosafety in a clinical laboratory emphasizes the use of BSL-2 facilities and standard precautions, however this may not be sufficient for all scenarios. Risk assessment is the foundation of every comprehensive biorisk management system, and is therefore just as important in clinical laboratories as in research laboratories where the hazards are generally better defined. However, due to the nature and breadth of work performed in clinical laboratories, the risk assessment process requires a unique approach. This course will promote a biorisk management style approach to biosafety in clinical laboratories, which emphasizes the importance of: conducting activity and laboratory specific risk assessments, implementing mitigation measures based on the risks that are specific to that particular clinical laboratory setting, and integrating a rigorous training and performance evaluation process that embraces continual assessment and improvement. Interactive activities and case studies will be used to reinforce the course concepts. Objectives: Recall the basics of biosafety risk assessment and its essential role in a biorisk management program Identify the unique challenges to assessing risk in the clinical laboratory environment Perform a risk assessment on a diagnostic testing scenario and identify gaps based on the real-life scenario outcomes Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment, Micro/Molecular Biology 101, Principles & Practices of Biosafety Albuquerque Convention Center, Albuquerque, NM ABSA International [email protected]

Clinical laboratories are unique environments. Their operations differ from those of academic (teaching) and research laboratories since the hazards associated with diagnostic specimens are almost always initially unknown. Serving as the frontline of defense for healthcare and public health systems, these labs regularly encounter both routine and emerging/resurging infectious agents. Additionally, they often conduct high-volume, high-throughput diagnostic testing, and rely on the use of highly automated instruments and technologies. The traditional guidance for biosafety in a clinical laboratory emphasizes the use of BSL-2 facilities and standard precautions, however this may not be sufficient for all scenarios. Risk assessment is the foundation of every comprehensive biorisk management system, and is therefore just as important in clinical laboratories as in research laboratories where the hazards are generally better defined. However, due to the nature and breadth of work performed in clinical laboratories, the risk assessment process requires a unique approach. This course will promote a biorisk management style approach to biosafety in clinical laboratories, which emphasizes the importance of: conducting activity and laboratory specific risk assessments, implementing mitigation measures based on the risks that are specific to that particular clinical laboratory setting, and integrating a rigorous training and performance evaluation process that embraces continual assessment and improvement. Interactive activities and case studies will be used to reinforce the course concepts.

Objectives:

  • Recall the basics of biosafety risk assessment and its essential role in a biorisk management program
  • Identify the unique challenges to assessing risk in the clinical laboratory environment
  • Perform a risk assessment on a diagnostic testing scenario and identify gaps based on the real-life scenario outcomes

Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment, Micro/Molecular Biology 101, Principles & Practices of Biosafety

13 – Case Studies in Biocontainment Emergencies

1:00 pm  -  5:00 pm
2018-10-13 13:01:00 2018-10-13 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 13 – Case Studies in Biocontainment Emergencies This course will focus solely on applying knowledge of emergency response, HVAC, plumbing, electrical issues and potential occupational exposures to select case studies. The expectation for this course is that the topics in the case studies have either been covered from attending the How to Respond to Emergency Scenarios in Biocontainment Laboratories course or in the individual’s own professional experience. During the course, participants will evaluate 25 total different case studies covering each of these areas. Participants taking this course will work through a subset of case studies and proper courses of action will be developed through collaboration and group discussion. Objectives: Describe the decision making process during an emergency response situation Identify lessons learned from case studies and apply them to their own institute emergencies Apply timely decisions about complex issues facing biocontainment laboratory operations and personnel Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment, Biosafety Level 3-Design and Operations, How to Respond to Emergency Scenarios in Biocontainment Laboratories Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Experienced Biosafety Professionals Albuquerque Convention Center, Albuquerque, NM ABSA International [email protected]

This course will focus solely on applying knowledge of emergency response, HVAC, plumbing, electrical issues and potential occupational exposures to select case studies. The expectation for this course is that the topics in the case studies have either been covered from attending the How to Respond to Emergency Scenarios in Biocontainment Laboratories course or in the individual’s own professional experience. During the course, participants will evaluate 25 total different case studies covering each of these areas. Participants taking this course will work through a subset of case studies and proper courses of action will be developed through collaboration and group discussion.

Objectives:

  • Describe the decision making process during an emergency response situation
  • Identify lessons learned from case studies and apply them to their own institute emergencies
  • Apply timely decisions about complex issues facing biocontainment laboratory operations and personnel

Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment, Biosafety Level 3-Design and Operations, How to Respond to Emergency Scenarios in Biocontainment Laboratories

Target Audience: All Safety Professionals, Experienced Biosafety Professionals